Advisory Board

Whitney Battle-Baptiste is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Director of the University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Center. She is a member of the W.E.B. Du Bois National Historic Site Working Committee.

John Bissell is the President and CEO of Greylock Federal Credit Union. He serves on the board of 1Berkshire, co-chairs the Berkshire Initiative for Growth and is the founder of the early literacy initiative, Pittsfield Promise.

Pearl Conaway is the sister of the late Reverend Esther Dozier, who was the first female pastor of the Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church. Retired from Becton Dickinson, she is secretary of the Macedonia Baptist Church in Great Barrington.

Maia Conty is a social change activist and is the co-founder of the Generosity Economy, a local group working to meet the needs and wants of their lives and community through gifting and relationship.

Rev. Mattie Conway is the sister of the late Reverend Esther Dozier, who was the first female pastor of the Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church. She serves as co-pastor of the Macedonia Baptist Church in Great Barrington.

Rachel Fletcher is Adjunct Professor at the New York School of Interior Design. She is the founding director of the Housatonic River Walk in Great Barrington, co-director of the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail, director of Friends of the W. E. B. Du Bois Boyhood Homesite, and a member of the W.E.B. Du Bois National Historic Site Working Committee.

David Glassberg is Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and an affiliated investigator with the Northeast Climate Science Center. He is the author of American Historical Pageantry: The Uses of Tradition in the Early Twentieth Century and Sense of History: The Place of the Past in American Life (2001) and a member of the W.E.B. Du Bois National Historic Site Working Committee.

Sally Harris is president of St. James Place, a nonprofit formed to save, restore and repurpose the former St. James Episcopal Church in Great Barrington as a center for arts and community.

Bobby Houston is a local developer and director of the Academy Award-winning film, Mighty Times: The Children’s March, and the Emmy Award-winning Mighty Times: The Legacy of Rosa Parks.

Barbara Krauthammer is an Associate Graduate Dean for Student Inclusion and Engagement and Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and the author of Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South. She is a trustee at the Samuel Harrison House in Pittsfield.

David Levinson is a cultural anthropologist and former church historian for the Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church. As a member of the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Trail, he edited African American Heritage in the Upper Housatonic Valley. He co-authored two other books about African American history in the Berkshires and is the author of Sewing Circles, Dime Suppers and W. E. B. Du Bois: A History of the Clinton A. M. E. Zion Church. A newly titled second edition of the book is forthcoming. 

Homer “Skip” Meade is an educator, researcher, and W.E.B. Du Bois scholar. He has taught in local public and private secondary schools and is a former member of the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Skip directed the National Historic Landmark Dedication of the W.E.B. Du Bois Boyhood Homesite, at which Julian Bond was the keynote speaker.

Wm. Smitty Pignatelli is the State Representative for Massachusetts’ 4th Berkshire District. He serves on the Committee of Ways & Means, Committee on Higher Education, and the Committee on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development, and is currently the House Chair of the Cultural Caucus. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Berkshire Visitors Bureau and is a former president of the Lenox Historical Society.

Eugenie Sills is a consultant and the principal of TWT Media. She co-founded the bi-annual festival Lift Ev’ry Voice: Celebrating African American Heritage and Culture in the Berkshires and was a founding board member of the Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts and the Berkshire Creative Economy Council.

Frances Jones-Sneed is a Professor of History at MCLA and associate editor of African American Heritage In the Upper Housatonic Valley. She is co-director of the Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail and a trustee at the Samuel Harrison House in Pittsfield.

Ted Thomas is an award-winning poet, author of three collections of poetry, and editor of more than a dozen anthologies. A veteran of the Black Arts Movement, he taught in the Department of Art Education at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and the Humanities Department at Roxbury Community College. He currently serves as Humanities Scholar for the W.E.B. Du Bois Educational Series in Great Barrington.

Randy Weinstein is the founder of the nonprofit Du Bois Center at Great Barrington and president of North Star Rare Books. He has published several works on African American history and lectured on race relations throughout the county. He serves on the W.E.B. Du Bois Educational Series in Great Barrington and was co-organizer of the Town of Great Barrington’s Du Bois 150th festival, held in 2018.